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Digital Offset Printing Process

Every morning this week, I’m running a series of guests posts about different printing methods – so if you’ve ever wondered why certain printing methods are best for certain kinds of designs (or cost more than others), this is for you! You can read the previous installments covering digital printing, engraving, screen printing, letterpress printing with antique type, and foil stamping all right here. Today we’re talking about offset printing, with help from Katie of and Nicole of .

Offset printing is often confused with digital printing – both are four-color flat printing methods, but the process is quite different! While offset printing is incredibly common, the printing process and procedures are often not well known., a family-owned print shop in Cranston, Rhode Island, provides offset printing to a range of clients around the United States, including Katie of in Los Angeles, California. Katie recently interviewed Nicole about the offset printing process.

Offset printing (or lithography) is what you probably see most often in your day to day travels. It is often used for direct mail postcards, business cards, brochures, pocket folders, signage and, yes, greeting cards and stationery. Offset varies from other print methods in many ways including technology, process, cost, material options and turn around time.

The Printing Process

The most important part of the offset printing process is the very beginning. It is important to ensure that you have very well prepared files. One of the biggest mistakes we see is a simple one, files must be converted from RGB to CMYK in order to print offset. This conversion will change the look of your piece, sometimes marginally, sometimes dramatically. Many designers are unsure how to prepare their files for an offset print job and can end up running into unplanned prepress costs to correct them. My best advice is to call your local printer and ask to speak with the pre-press manager. These people are such valuable resources to an artist or designer and can help you avoid trouble spots through the rest of the print process. Often, much of this information can be found online on the printer’s website.

The stock will be cut to the size of the press it is being run on and depending on the size and scope if the project it can run for as short as 30 minutes or as long as multiple days. Once the press run is complete, bindery is the next stage. That could mean, die cutting, scoring, stamping, numbering, folding, stitching, etc. This can be a multi day process as ink needs to dry before you can finish a job and get it boxed for delivery.

Offset Printing vs. Digital Printing

My best advice is to get a good referral to a printer! It doesn’t have to be in your area (although it may help). It is super important to find a printer that is invested in YOUR project and understands the exact outcome you are trying to achieve. If the printer is a good and honorable one, they will give you all of the options and recommend the best one, even if it’s not something that they offer. It is important to keep in mind that all printers have different niche’s, some have smaller presses, some have larger and your project may or may not be an economical fit for their equipment. Don’t be afraid to ask them if your project is a good fit for them.

Nicole Couto is a sales person at the family-owned in Cranston, Rhode Island. They are celebrating their 30th anniversary this year!

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Source: ohsobeautifulpaper.com
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