ATOM GALLERY - A little

Print Shops in London

Next, I’ll go to the Fine Art Society stand to snap up Gertrude Hermes’ wood engraving, Two People (1934). A fine sculptor and only the second wood engraver ever elected a Royal Academician in the category of printmaking, Hermes made engravings and linocuts notable for their exuberantly bold cutting combined with rich tonal and textural effects. Wood engravings remain surprisingly modestly priced and this example – with its Picasso-style entwined couple in singing black and white – is a snip at £3, 750.

Nipping over to Abbott & Holder, I will pause to pick up, at only £225, one of Blair Hughes-Stanton’s wonderful tiny wood engravings, from 1930, that illustrated an edition of Thomas de Quincey’s The Confessions of an English Opium Eater. Hughes-Stanton was Hermes’ husband for seven years, until they divorced in 1933: their works display fascinating parallels. Abbott & Holder have a range of Hughes-Stanton’s engravings – well worth browsing.

Still with £11, 025 to spend, I’ll make for Rabley Contemporary to buy Emma Stibbon RA’s latest intaglio print at £1, 250: Lead II (2014, above), which emerged from her recent visit to the Antarctic, organised by the Scott Polar Research Institute. Stibbon voyaged on the Royal Navy icebreaker HMS Protector and this image shows the zigzag track the ship cut through the frozen sea. Stibbon’s work involves in situ examinations of Earth’s fragile crust and the precarious state of our global environment, from Icelandic volcanoes to Arctic ice floes, which she translates into intensely wrought, haunting images, often at epic scale. Tempting contemporary prints by other RAs can also be found at Rabley, Brook Gallery, Marlborough, Paupers Press and RA Editions.

Onward to Julian Page for Dutch-born Marcelle Hanselaar’s new etching: White collar black man (2014, above) at £895. In a variable edition of 30, it employs painterly red hand-colouring contrasted with a rich black etched line. Inspired, in Hanselaar’s words, by a “tiny gem of a painting by Govert Flinck”, her print, she says, is “a response to the slave trade and colonialist view that a non-white person was not a person till they were moulded in dress, behaviour and thinking to resemble a white person.” Hanselaar’s subjects have the raw earthiness and deft characterization of Paula Rego’s figures, coupled with the more experimental qualities of William Kentridge Hon RA’s prints – all compelling attributes.

Now I head to Long & Ryle for Su Blackwell’s book-cut sculpture Magnolia Tree (2013), at £7, 200. Much imitated, Blackwell’s delicate, carefully considered pieces are arguably the most original of their genre, and are keenly collected. While printmaking is not their creative impetus, printed pages provide these sculptures’ whimsical appeal.

See also:
Source: www.royalacademy.org.uk
RELATED VIDEO
City of London canvas print by sylvia scotting
City of London canvas print by sylvia scotting
Sunrise over London canvas print by Gary Rayner
Sunrise over London canvas print by Gary Rayner
London Bridge canvas print by Tim Smith
London Bridge canvas print by Tim Smith
RELATED FACTS
Share this Post

Related posts

Where to Print in London?

Where to Print in London?

DECEMBER 16, 2017

Internet Express Station (20 minutes/day) All the same services as an Internet Station No library card required *Not available…

Read More
London Print Shops

London Print Shops

DECEMBER 16, 2017

NELLY DUFF -Columbia Rd. Stocks a lot of top names in street artist such as Ben Eine as well as anthropomorphic illustrator…

Read More